Managing Transport Demand

The aim of Infrastructure Victoria’s Managing Transport Demand research program is to examine ways to get the most efficient use out of the transport network.

The program is building on the work undertaken for Victoria’s 30-year infrastructure strategy, which included a recommendation for transport network pricing to be implemented in 5-15 years to best manage transport demand in the long term, and the discussion paper The road ahead.

 

Five-year focus: Immediate actions to tackle congestion

Infrastructure Victoria has released the research paper Five year focus: Immediate actions to tackle congestion.
The paper identifies key problem areas now and in the future on Melbourne’s transport network and examines what can be done over the next five years to improve travel time and reliability.

Our research shows road congestion is forecast to get worse over the next 15 years and on some parts of the network, increases in journey times and declines in reliability will be significant.

To cope with the growth in transport demand in the short term, Infrastructure Victoria has developed a package of recommendations for government which are practical, low cost, could be delivered quickly and build on existing measures that have proven effective. Key recommendations include to:

  • expand off-peak fares on the metropolitan public transport network
  • expand and increase the car parking levy
  • maximise opportunities to encourage travel behaviour change during disruptions to the transport network
  • overhaul existing bus services, expanding successful routes and replacing poor performing routes with low cost, customer-responsive services
  • establish a transparent fare-setting regime
  • better allocate road space to prioritise efficiency on identified movement corridors
  • increase investment to introduce additional bus services in areas of high demand
  • prioritise active transport investment to high potential areas
  • improve road connectivity on parts of the network where private vehicle use works best.

Together, the recommendations seek to spread demand more evenly across modes and times to ease pressure on the network, particularly at peak times. Their focus is to encourage people who can be flexible in how they travel in peak periods, to either use public or active transport rather than driving, or shift the time they travel to outside the peak period.

To find out more about Infrastructure Victoria's recommendations, read the research paper.

 

Insight into how Melbourne moves

Our latest research used a new approach to modelling to better understand how Melbourne’s roads might be used in 2030, and provide a comparison to 2015.

We have also undertaken community research to explore people’s travel behaviour and attitudes. We wanted to examine the experiences of people who regularly drive during peak times.

Here are some fast facts from this research:

  • There will be an estimated 3.5 million extra trips daily across Melbourne’s transport network in 2030.
  • Cars are likely to still account for 70% of trips in 2030.
  • 1 in 4 of our surveyed peak period drivers said they could change their time of travel.
  • 1 in 3 of our surveyed peak period drivers said they could change their mode of travel.
  • Only 17% of survey respondents who regularly drive during peak pay for parking.
  • People who said they sometimes chose not to drive cited parking as being the number one reason.

For an overview of the key findings from both the modelling and the survey, read our fact sheet or watch our short video below.

About the Melbourne Activity Based Model

Infrastructure Victoria's Managing Transport Demand research program used the Melbourne Activity Based Model to understand how Melbourne’s roads might be used in 2030, and provide a comparison to 2015.

The development of the Melbourne Activity Based Model is a significant first for Australia.

The transport model is people focussed and tests the response of individuals to change. This is different from traditional transport modelling which focuses on trips and modes within the transport network but does not explicitly consider the behaviour of individuals travelling on that network.

Our initial modelling of 2030 is based on current behaviours and planned investments but we recognise that new technologies, projects and policies could dramatically change how people use the transport network in the future. Like any modelling, it is a forecast based upon certain assumptions – we can’t predict the future, but we use best available information and evidence to help plan for future infrastructure needs.

It should be noted for simplicity we have referred to the year 2030 in our materials. The actual modelling work forecasts travel patterns to 2031, which is reflected in the below video and KPMG and Arup reports.

To find out more about how the model works, watch the video below or read the KPMG Arup - MABM Validation Report.

 

Publications

Five-year focus: Immediate actions to tackle congestion April 2018 (PDF 11.3MB)

Five-year focus: Immediate actions to tackle congestion April 2018 (Word 3.6MB)

KPMG Arup - Travel Demand and Movement Patterns Report (PDF 4.2MB)

KPMG Arup - MABM Validation Report (PDF 6.3MB)

Fact sheet - How Melbourne moves (PDF 2.1KB)

Fact sheet - Melbourne Activity Based Model (PDF 90.7KB)

Quantum community research dataset Part 1 (PDF 173.3KB)

Quantum community research dataset Part 2 (PDF 688KB)

University of NSW behaviour change research paper (945KB)

The road ahead: How an efficient, fair and sustainable pricing regime can help tackle congestion November 2016 (PDF 5.5MB)

The road ahead: How an efficient, fair and sustainable pricing regime can help tackle congestion November 2016 (Word 1.1MB)

Consultation report - Responses to The road ahead (PDF 2.2MB)